Comparative effects of UV A and UV B on clonogenic survival and delayed cell death in skin cell lines from humans and fish Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • The effects of UV radiation on humans and animals are receiving increasing attention and much interest has recently been focused on the environmental effects of UV A and UV B. This study compares the in vitro effects of UV A and UV B on the clonogenic survival of two human skin keratinocyte cell lines, HaCaT which are immortal but not tumorigenic and HPV-G transfected keratinocytes which form non malignant tumours in nude mice. The effects were also studied on an EPC fish cell line. The aim of the work was to establish if similar initial and delayed survival responses occurred in both species. The cells were exposed to ultraviolet lamps emitting maximally at 365 nm (UV A) and 302 nm (UV B). Clonogenic survival was determined at appropriate times post exposure. Results for the initial survival curves show that the HaCaT and HPV-G cells did not show any appreciable difference in their response to UV A but the EPC cells were more sensitive at doses < 3000 Jm-2. The EPC cells were more sensitive to UV B at doses < 200 Jm-2 in comparison to the human HaCaT and HPV-G cells with the HPV-G cells showing the most sensitivity to UV B at doses > 200 Jm-2. The possible contribution of lethal mutations (delayed cell death) to the UV radiation response in the HaCaT and EPC cell lines was examined. The results showed that lethal mutations were expressed in the HaCaT cells following exposure to UV A and UV B but no lethal mutations were expressed in the EPC cells.

publication date

  • January 1997