Factors Associated With Women’s Plans to Gain Weight Categorized as Above or Below the National Guidelines During Pregnancy Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • OBJECTIVE: Given that planning to gain gestational weight categorized as above the national guidelines is associated with actually gaining above the guidelines, we sought to identify physical, lifestyle, knowledge, and psychological factors associated with planned weight gain. METHODS: Using a piloted, self-administered questionnaire, a cross-sectional study of women with singleton pregnancies was conducted. Women's plans for weight gain were categorized as above, within, or below the guidelines. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. RESULTS: The response rate was 90.7% (n = 330). Compared with women whose plans to gain weight were within the guidelines, women whose plans to gain were above the guidelines were more likely to be older (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.09 per year; 95% CI 1.03 to 1.16), to have a greater pre-pregnancy BMI (aOR 1.17 per unit of BMI; 95% CI 1.10 to 1.25), to drink more than one glass of soft drink or juice per day (aOR 2.73; 95% CI 1.27 to 5.87), and to report receiving a recommendation by their care provider to gain weight above the guidelines (aOR 5.46; 95% CI 1.56 to 19.05). Women whose plans to gain weight were categorized as below the guidelines were more likely to eat lunch in front of a screen (aOR 2.27; 95% CI 1.11 to 4.66) and to aspire to greater social desirability (aOR 2.51; 95% CI 1.01 to 6.22). CONCLUSION: Modifiable factors associated with planned gestational weight gain categorized as above the guidelines included soft drink or juice consumption and having a recommendation from a care provider, while planned weight gain categorized as below the guidelines was associated with eating lunch in front of a screen and social desirability.

publication date

  • March 2015