Reliability of the Crossed-Hands Deficit in Tactile Temporal Order Judgements Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Abstract Crossing the hands over the midline impairs performance on a tactile temporal order judgement (TOJ) task, resulting in the crossed-hands deficit. This deficit results from a conflict between two reference frames — one internal (somatotopic) and the other external (spatial) — for coding stimulus location. The substantial individual differences observed in the crossed-hands deficit highlight the differential reliance on these reference frames. For example, women have been reported to place a greater emphasis on the external reference frame than men, resulting in a larger crossed-hands deficit for women. It has also been speculated that individuals with an eating disorder place a greater weight on the external reference frame. Further exploration of individual differences in reference frame weighing using a tactile TOJ task requires that the reliability of the task be established. In Experiment 1, we investigated the reliability of the tactile TOJ task across two sessions separated by one week and found high reliability in the magnitude of the crossed-hands deficit. In Experiment 2, we report the split-half reliability across multiple experiments (both published and unpublished). Overall, tactile TOJ reliability was high. Experiments with small to moderate crossed-hands deficits showed good reliability; those with larger deficits showed even higher reliability. Researchers should try to maximize the size of the effect when interested in individual differences in the use of the internal and external reference frames.

publication date

  • September 29, 2020