Impact of the integrated comprehensive care program post-thoracic surgery: A propensity score–matched study Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • OBJECTIVE: Thoracic surgery is associated with significant rates of postoperative morbidity and postdischarge return to the hospital or emergency department (ED). This study aims to assess the impact of a novel integrated patient-centered, hospital-based multidisciplinary community program (Integrated Comprehensive Care [ICC]) on postdischarge outcomes in patients undergoing thoracic surgery compared to routine care. METHODS: This was a retrospective cohort study of patients who underwent surgical resection for lung malignancies at a tertiary care center from 2010 to 2014. Patients were divided into 2 cohorts based on their enrollment in the ICC program (intervention cohort; 2012-2014) or routine postoperative care (control cohort; 2010-2012). Propensity score matching was performed to match the 2 cohorts. The impact of the ICC program on postoperative length of stay (LOS), rate of ED visits, readmissions, and mortality within the first 60 days was assessed. RESULTS: Of the 1288 patients included in this study, 658 (51.1%) were male patients with mean age of 64 years (standard deviation 14.1 years). After propensity score matching, 478 patients were enrolled in the ICC cohort and 592 were enrolled as controls. The ICC cohort had significantly shorter LOS (4 days, vs 5 days in controls, P = .001), lower rate of 60-day ED visits (9.8% vs 28.4% in controls, P < .001), and readmissions (6.9% vs 8.6% in controls, P < .001). The 60-day mortality was also significantly lower in the ICC cohort compared with the control group (0.6% vs 0.8% in controls, P < .001). CONCLUSIONS: The ICC program is associated with shorter LOS, fewer ED visits and readmissions after discharge, and ultimately may decrease postoperative mortality.

publication date

  • June 2020