The Colonial Contours of Indigenous Women's Inclusion in the Americas - The Peruvian Experience Article uri icon

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abstract

  • This community-based collaborative project explores the day-to-day impacts of exclusion, resiliency, and agency of Indigenous Women (IW) and how they are situated in the local and global histories of colonization. To provide a snapshot of the IW's realities, the objectives are: (i) to gain insight into how the state has been both active and complacent in respecting IW's rights, (ii) to enhance our understanding about the processes leading to silencing and further marginalizing IW's voices, particularly in feminist organizing and NGOs, (iii) to bring together IW to learn from each other, and co-create knowledge(s) with a resistance and transformative agenda, and finally, (iv) to contribute to the agenda of knowledge(s) as resistance, rooted in a complementary relationship between Indigenous and Global North ways of knowing. This transformative agenda employs methods related to narrative inquiry and Peruvian Ñoqanchiq and Allin Kawsay as a way of engagement and honouring the ideal. By engaging in local crafts, it promotes this tradition and opens space to share ancestral knowledge.