Feasibility of Pedometer Use to Assess Physical Activity and Its Relationship With Quality of Life in Children With Epilepsy: A Pilot Study Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • BACKGROUND: Children and youth with epilepsy have lower rates of self-reported and parent-reported physical activity as well as quality of life when compared with their peers. Increased physical activity may be associated with improved health and quality of life in children and youth with epilepsy through biopsychosocial mechanisms; however, supportive evidence is lacking. METHODS: This pilot study aims to determine the feasibility of pedometer use-an objective method-to assess daily steps and ability to complete quality of life-related questionnaires in children and youth with epilepsy. Feasibility was determined by percentage of study completion and participant enjoyment of physical activity in the form of walking as determined by the Childhood Self Adequacy and Predilection in Physical Activity. Secondary measures included the KidScreen 27 Quality of Life questionnaire, Childhood Depression Index, Body Mass Index, Harter's Self Perception Scale, and Parental Stress Index. CONCLUSIONS: Eight of 12 eligible participants completed the study. Step counts ranged from 266 to 17,220 steps per day. Seven participants found physical activity enjoyable regardless of step count, suggesting they would be amenable to participate in a future physical activity program.

publication date

  • November 2013