A Trimodality Comparison of Volumetric Bone Imaging Technologies. Part II: 1-Yr Change, Long-Term Precision, and Least Significant Change Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • The previous article in this 3-part series demonstrated short-term precision and validity for volumetric bone outcome quantification using in vivo peripheral (p) quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) modalities at resolutions 200 μm or higher. However, 1-yr precision error and clinically significant references are yet to be reported for these modalities. This study examined 59 women with mean age of 75 ± 9 yr and body mass index of 26.84 ± 4.77 kg/m², demonstrating the lowest 1-yr precision error, standard errors of the estimate, and least significant change values for high-resolution (hr) pQCT followed by pQCT, and 1.0-T pMRI for all volumetric bone outcomes except trabecular number. Like short-term precision, 1-yr statistics for trabecular separation were similar across modalities. Excluding individuals with a previous history of fragility fractures, or who were current users of antiresorptives reduced 1-yr change for bone outcomes derived from pQCT and pMR images, but not hr-pQCT images. In Part II of this 3-part series focused on trimodality comparisons of 1-yr changes, hr-pQCT was recommended to be the prime candidate for quantifying change where smaller effect sizes are expected, but pQCT was identified as a feasible alternative for studies expecting larger changes.

publication date

  • April 2015