Mechanisms of transport of H+, Na+ and K+, across the distal gastric caecum of larval Aedes aegypti Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Measured changes in ion fluxes, transepithelial potential (TEP) and basolateral membrane potential (Vb) in response to ion transporter inhibitors were used to assess the mechanisms of transport of H+, Na+ and K+, across the distal gastric caecum of larval Aedes aegypti, a vector of yellow fever. Preparations were stimulated with 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT, 10-6 M) in order to maintain stable rates of H+, Na+, and K+ transport across the distal caecum. Transepithelial potential (TEP), basolateral membrane potential (Vb), and H+, Na+ and K+ fluxes all declined after the addition of a vacuolar-type H+-ATPase (VA) inhibitor, n-ethlymaleimide (NEM), consistent with a primary role for VA in energizing ion transport across the distal gastric caecum. Amiloride also inhibited H+, Na+, and K+ fluxes, consistent with an apically expressed VA that is coupled to a cation:H+ antiporter (AeNHE8), analogous to the coupling of apical VA and cation:nH+ antiporter in Malpighian tubules. A working model of transport of H+, Na+ and K+ across the distal gastric caecum proposes that coupling of VA and AeNHE8 in the apical membrane leads to the removal of intracellular Na+ or K+, thus creating favourable ion gradients to promote the activity of two transporters in the basal membrane, cation:H+ antiporter (AeNHE3) and a bumetanide-sensitive cation chloride cotransporter (CCC).

publication date

  • February 2020