Determinants of Sedentary Behaviour in Individuals with COPD: A Qualitative Exploration Guided by the Theoretical Domains Framework Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • In people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), there is increasing recognition that the prolonged accumulation of sedentary time (ST) is associated with adverse cardio-metabolic health outcomes. Nevertheless, changing this lifestyle, which has evolved over several decades, is likely to be challenging. This study reports the determinants, perceived by individuals with COPD, as being important for reducing ST. An in-depth understanding of this information is essential when planning an intervention to reduce ST. Fourteen individuals with COPD completed semi-structured one-on-one interviews, which were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim. Both the interview schedule and mapping of data items extracted from the interview transcripts were informed by the Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF). A total of 867 quotes were mapped to the 14 TDF domains. Seven of the fourteen domains were identified as being important determinants for reducing ST: knowledge, beliefs about consequences, beliefs about capabilities, environmental context and resources, social influences, social/professional role and identity, and behavioural regulation. There was a lack of knowledge regarding the meaning of sedentary behaviour. Participants' desire to be educated by knowledgeable health professionals in a formal programme was a dominant theme across multiple domains. The most frequently reported barriers to reducing ST related to the domains of social/professional role and identity and environmental context and resources, while the most frequently reported enablers were related to the domains pertaining to beliefs about consequences and social influences. Potential strategies to reduce ST among people with COPD include education and other determinants identified in this research.

authors

  • Wshah, Adnan
  • Selzler, Anne-Marie
  • Hill, Kylie
  • Brooks, Dina
  • Goldstein, Roger

publication date

  • January 2, 2020