Resident Attitudes Towards Caesarean Delivery in Canadian Obstetrics and Gynaecology Residency Programs Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to explore the attitudes of obstetrics and gynaecology residents in Canada towards interventions that influence caesarean section rates. The study looked at residents' attitudes towards four guidelines that support vaginal and assisted delivery (vaginal birth after caesarean section, induction of labour, operative vaginal birth, and fetal health surveillance in labour) and towards Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada (SOGC) guidelines in general. The study also sought to investigate whether these attitudes vary by residency training location. METHODS: An online survey of obstetrics and gynaecology residents across Canada was conducted. Residents responded to statements derived from guidelines using a five-point attitudinal scale and to an optional long-answer question about how residency has prepared them to make decisions around interventions. Descriptive summary statistics are used to present the findings (Canadian Task Force Classification III). RESULTS: A total of 27% of residents completed the survey. The majority demonstrated attitudes congruent with guidelines and favourable towards SOGC guidelines in general. Residents attitudes were least favourable towards electronic fetal monitoring, with 67.4% of responses congruent with the guideline. Attitudes were most aligned with the operative vaginal birth guideline, with 87.9% of responses congruent with the guideline. This sample was underpowered to detect statistically significant differences among residency programs, although there was some variation in attitudes across programs, with the most congruent scoring program at 81.8% congruent responses and the lowest at 66.7%. CONCLUSION: Obstetrics and gynaecology residents in Canada have favourable attitudes towards interventions that support vaginal and assisted delivery. There was variability in observed attitudes across programs, although this was not statistically significant.

publication date

  • January 2020