Professional identity and emerging occupational therapy practice: An autoethnography Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Background. Research about occupational therapy practice in the community with people who have been imprisoned remains limited and may be considered an emerging area of practice. Purpose. This paper provides a critical, first-person account about emerging occupational therapy practice with men transitioning to the community post-imprisonment. The practice context is described and reflected on from the lens of a new graduate. Methods. Autoethnography draws meaning from reciprocal interactions between an individual and a culture. Data was collected by the primary author through reflective journal entries and process notes pertaining to a Photovoice project. Iterative application of established evaluative criteria served as a framework in an analytical writing process. Findings. Autethnography promoted self-reflection and professional development while Photovoice provided an evidence-based framework in an emerging setting. Implications. Current occupational therapy theories and models have limited applicability to inform practice with marginalized populations potentially benefitting from participatory research (e.g., Photovoice) and autoethnography.

publication date

  • February 2020