Performance of male and female children, adolescents and adults on spatial tasks that involve everyday objects and settings. Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Nine different spatial tests were given to 52 male and 52 female children, 30 male and 33 female adolescents and 46 male and 48 female adults. Eight of the tests were designed to involve stimuli and settings with which subjects would have everyday experience. Significant sex differences were observed only on 2 of the nine tasks. In those cases where sex differences were observed, the effect sizes were well below .100, suggesting that the magnitudes of the sex differences were minimal. The fact that no sex effects were found on 7 of the 9 spatial tasks allows, at most, the statement that males perform better than females on some spatial tasks. There is no justification for the global statement that "males excel in spatial abilities".

publication date

  • December 1993