Effect of blood transfusion on survival in a mouse bacterial peritonitis model Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Allogeneic blood transfusions can result in alloimmunization or immunosuppression. A previous study demonstrated a deleterious effect of allogeneic blood transfusion on tumor growth in mice that was dependent, in part, on the dose of tumor cells with which the host animal was inoculated. The current study examined the effect of a similar allogeneic blood transfusion protocol on survival in a mouse bacterial peritonitis model. C57Bl/6J mice were transfused with 0.2 mL of heparinized fresh whole blood from C57Bl/6J (syngeneic) or Balb/c (allogeneic) mice. Transfusions were given on Days -10 and -7. On Day 0, mice were injected intraperitoneally with 10(7) Escherichia coli. Survival at Day 7 was 61 percent in the allogeneic blood transfusion group and 55 percent in the syngeneic blood transfusion group (p = 0.52). Experiments using different strains of mice, different transfusion protocols, and different doses of bacteria also failed to demonstrate an effect of allogeneic blood transfusion on survival. The results demonstrate that blood transfusion does not influence survival after a septic challenge with bacteria. The data obtained in the present study, together with those obtained in the tumor model, suggest that the mechanisms by which the allogeneic blood transfusion impedes host defense against bacterial infections is different from the mechanisms involved in tumor growth.

publication date

  • October 1991