In vivo biomicroscopy with ultrasound 2. Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • In the first article of this series it was shown that the use of inverse scattering theory to analyse ultrasound reflections could provide high resolution images of the acoustic impedance profile of the retina. Unlike the retina, most tissue structures of interest, like small tumours and arterial plaque deposits, are shielded from view by intervening layers of tissue of appreciable acoustic impedance and attenuation. By analysing a one-dimensional model for a plaque deposit on the wall of a carotid artery embedded in a 5 cm thick layer of tissue, we demonstrate that a relatively high quality image can be recovered when compensation for the attenuation of the intervening tissue is made. We observe that because of the dearth of low frequency power in the recovered signal of ultrasound transducers, it is important that the field of view imaged is not taken to be too large. We compare the exact iterative distorted wave Born approximation inverse scattering method with the approximate but computationally faster plane wave Born approximation method and find that they give images of comparable quality for this model.

publication date

  • January 1990