The effectiveness of smoking cessation interventions in smokers with cerebrovascular disease: a systematic review Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • OBJECTIVE: The main objective of this study was to determine the effectiveness of smoking cessation interventions (SCIs) for increasing cessation rates in smokers with cerebrovascular disease. DESIGN: Systematic review. Two independent reviewers searched information sources and assessed studies for inclusion/exclusion criteria. ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA FOR INCLUDED STUDIES: Randomised control trials, conducted prior to the 22 May 2012 investigating SCIs in smokers with cerebrovascular disease, were included. No age or ethnicity limitations were applied in order to be as inclusive as possible. METHODS: We followed the PRISMA statement approach to identify relevant randomised control studies. Due to the variability of interventions used in the reported studies, a meta-analysis was not conducted. RESULTS: Of 852 identified articles, 4 articles fit the inclusion criteria describing the outcome in 354 patients. The overall cessation rate with an SCI was 23.9% (42 of 176) while without one was 20.8% (37 of 178). CONCLUSIONS: There are a limited number of reported intervention studies that explore this area of secondary stroke prevention. Furthermore, of those intervention studies that were found, only two implemented evidence-based approaches to smoking cessation. A meta-analysis was not conducted because of the variability of interventions in the reported studies. Larger studies with homogeneous interventions are needed to determine how effective SCIs are in increasing cessation in smokers with established cerebrovascular disease.

publication date

  • 2012