Bacterial neuraminidase-mediated erythrocyte desialylation provokes cell surface aminophospholipid exposure Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • BACKGROUND: Surface desialylation is associated with erythrocyte aging and mediates phagocytic recognition and clearance of senescent erythrocytes. Neuraminidases, a family of glycohydrolytic enzymes, cleave the glycosidic linkages between sialic acid and mucopolysaccharides and have previously been implicated in erythrocyte dysfunction associated with sepsis. Erythrocytes in septic patients further display a phenotype of accelerated eryptosis characterized by membrane phospholipid scrambling resulting in phosphatidylserine (PS) externalization. Herein, we examined the impact of artificial erythrocyte desialylation on eryptosis. METHODS: Using flow cytometry and/or fluorescence microscopy, we analyzed desialylation patterns and eryptotic alterations in erythrocytes exposed to Clostridium perfringens-derived neuraminidase. RESULTS: Exogenous bacterial neuraminidase significantly augmented membrane PS exposure and cytosolic Ca2+ levels in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Neuraminidase treatment significantly reduced fluorescence-tagged agglutinin binding, an effect temporally preceding the increase in PS externalization. Neuraminidase-induced PS exposure was significantly curtailed by pretreatment with the pan-sialidase inhibitor N-acetyl-2,3-dehydro-2-deoxyneuraminic acid. Neuraminidase treatment further induced hemolysis but did not significantly impact erythrocyte volume, ceramide abundance, or the generation of reactive oxygen species. CONCLUSION: Collectively, our data reveal that alteration of erythrocyte sialylation status by bacterial neuraminidase favors eryptotic cell death, an effect potentially contributing to reduced erythrocyte lifespan and anemia in sepsis.

publication date

  • May 2018