Brachial artery endothelial function is unchanged after acute sprint interval exercise in sedentary men and women Academic Article uri icon

  •  
  • Overview
  •  
  • Research
  •  
  • Identity
  •  
  • Additional Document Info
  •  
  • View All
  •  

abstract

  • NEW FINDINGS: What is the central question of this study? What is the acute brachial artery endothelial function response to sprint interval exercise and are there sex-based differences? What is the main finding and its importance? Brachial artery endothelial function did not change in either men or women following an acute session of SIT consisting of 3 × 20 s 'all-out' cycling sprints. Our findings suggest this low-volume protocol may not be sufficient to induce functional changes in the brachial artery of sedentary, but otherwise healthy adults. ABSTRACT: Sprint interval training (SIT) is a potent metabolic stimulus, but studies examining its acute effects on brachial artery endothelial function are limited. The influence of oestradiol on the acute arterial response to this type of exercise is also unknown. We investigated the brachial artery endothelial function response to a single session of SIT in sedentary healthy men (n = 8; 22 ± 4 years) and premenopausal women tested in the mid-follicular phase of the menstrual cycle (n = 8; 21 ± 3 years). Participants performed 3 × 20 s 'all-out' cycling sprints interspersed with 2 min of active recovery. Brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) and haemodynamic parameters were measured before and 1 and 24 h post-exercise. Despite attenuations in some haemodynamic parameters at 1 h post-exercise, there were no changes in absolute (P = 0.23), relative (P = 0.23) or allometrically scaled FMD (P = 0.38) following a single session of SIT. Resting and peak dilatory diameters did not change in men or women (P > 0.05 for all) and there were no interactions between time and sex for any measure (P > 0.05). Oestradiol was not correlated with relative FMD at baseline (r = -0.22, P = 0.42) or with the change in relative FMD from baseline to 1 h post-exercise (r = 0.24, P = 0.40). Overall, brachial artery FMD appears to be unchanged in men and women following an acute session of SIT, and the higher oestradiol concentrations in women do not augment the baseline or post-exercise FMD response. The 3 × 20 s model of low-volume sprint interval exercise may not be sufficient to alter brachial artery endothelial function in healthy men and women.

publication date

  • July 2018