Disambiguating auditory information causes priming, but not aftereffects, in the perception of ambiguous faces Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • In five experiments, we used a visual aftereffects paradigm to probe whether emotion- and gender-relevant information presented in the auditory domain would affect the formation of visual aftereffects or would instead create a priming effect. In experiment 1, participants fixated on surprise facial expressions while listening to a story that described the surprise as either happy or sad, and then were asked to classify the expression of a briefly presented neutral face. Subsequently, the identity of the model (experiment 2) and the timing of the auditory presentation (experiment 3) were manipulated. In experiment 4, this approach was extended to judgments of gender. Experiment 5 serves as a control experiment in which the story, but no visual stimuli, was presented during the adaptation phase. In each case results revealed evidence of priming, but no evidence that information in the auditory domain affected the formation of aftereffects.

publication date

  • May 2018