Adhesion of platelets to artificial surfaces: Effect of red cells Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Adhesion of platelets to several polymer- and protein-coated glass surfaces has been studied in vitro. The apparatus consists of a cylindrical probe rotating in a test tube containing the platelet medium and allows close control of fluid shear and mass transport. Suspensions of washed pig platelets constitute the basic platelet medium, and can be modified by adding back red cells and plasma proteins. Adhesion is measured via 51Cr-labeling of platelets. In the absence of red cells, identical low levels of adhesion were seen on all surfaces and saturation was reached within 2 min. In the presence of red cells, adhesion was greater. Saturation on all surfaces except fibrinogen and collagen again occurred within 2 min. The adhesion levels on polymer surfaces and glass were indistinguishable, while those on albumin were lower and those on fibrinogen were higher. Collagen was the most reactive surface. It did not equilibrate within 15 min., and kinetic data indicated a platelet diffusivity strongly dependent on hematocrit. These effects were attributed to rotational and translational motion of the red cells causing increased diffusion and surface-platelet collision energy.

publication date

  • May 1976