Interactions of proteins in human plasma with modified polystyrene resins Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Investigations are reported on the composition of protein layers adsorbed from plasma to various modified polystyrene resins. As well as polystyrene itself, polystyrene bearing sulfonate groups in the benzene rings, and polystyrene sulfonate in which the sulfonate groups were converted to amino acid sulfamide, were investigated. Some of these resins were shown in previous work to have anticoagulant properties. To study the adsorption of proteins from plasma, the resins were exposed to citrate anticoagulated human plasma for 3 h. Adsorbed proteins were then eluted sequentially by 1M Tris buffer and 4% SDS solution, and examined by SDS-PAGE. The gel patterns were similar on all resins except polystyrene. From the MWs of the gel bands, the major protein component appeared to be fibrinogen. Smaller amounts of plasminogen, transferrin, albumin, and IgG were also present. In addition, Ouchterlony immunoassay of the eluates from one resin gave positive identification of complement C3, fibronectin, IgG, and IgM. Many other minor gel bands remain unidentified. A consistent finding for all resins was the presence of plasmin-type fibrinogen degradation products though the amounts varied with resin type. It is concluded from this (and from experiments showing FDP formation when fibrinogen was absorbed to the resins, from buffer containing a trace of plasminogen) that the functional groups in these materials promote the adsorption of plasminogen and its activation to a plasmin-like molecule. It appears from the substantial quantities of fibrinogen adsorbed to these materials after 3 h exposure to plasma that the Vroman effect (giving transient adsorption of fibrinogen) is not operative on these materials. It is hypothesized that specific interactions occur between fibrinogen and sulfonate groups.

publication date

  • January 1991