Head-to-Head Comparison of Second-Generation Nucleic Acid Amplification Tests for Detection of Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae on Urine Samples from Female Subjects and Self-Collected Vaginal Swabs Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • In a comparison of 4 second-generation nucleic acid amplification tests performed with self-collected vaginal swab (SCVS) and first-void urine (FVU) specimens from 575 women, SCVS specimens indicated more infections than did FVU specimens in all assays. The prevalence rates were 9% (53/575 patients) for Chlamydia trachomatis and 2% (11/575 patients) for Neisseria gonorrhoeae. The clinical sensitivities for testing SCVS specimens for C. trachomatis were 98.1% on a Tigris system and 96.2% on a Panther system for the Aptima Combo 2 assay (Hologic Gen-Probe), 98.0% for the RealTime CT/NG assay on an m2000 instrument (Abbott), 90.6% for the ProbeTec CT/GC Q(x) assay on the Viper system (Becton Dickinson), and 84.6% for the cobas CT/NG assay on the cobas 4800 platform (Roche). Clinical sensitivities for C. trachomatis in FVU specimens were 88.7% (Tigris) and 88.0% (Panther) for the Aptima Combo 2 assay, 76.9% for the RealTime CT/NG assay, 75.5% for the ProbeTec CT/GC Q(x) assay, and 81.1% for the cobas CT/NG assay. Clinical sensitivities of the assays for N. gonorrhoeae, with limited positive results, ranged from 63.6% to 100%. Specificities for both infections ranged from 98.4 to 100%. Differences in analytical sensitivities and levels of molecular targets in clinical samples but not inhibitors of amplification may explain the differences in clinical sensitivities.

publication date

  • July 1, 2014

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