Effects of postexercise milk consumption on whole body protein balance in youth Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • In adults, adding protein to a postexercise beverage increases muscle protein turnover and replenishes amino acid stores. Recent focus has shifted toward the use of bovine-based milk and milk products as potential postexercise beverages; however, little is known about how this research translates to the pediatric population. Twenty-eight (15 girls) pre- to early pubertal (PEP, 7-11 yr) and mid- to late-pubertal (MLP, 14-17 yr) children consumed an oral dose of [(15)N]glycine prior to performing 2 × 20-min cycling bouts at 60% V̇O(2 peak) in a warm environment (34.5°C, 47.3% relative humidity). Following exercise, participants consumed either water (W), a carbohydrate-electrolyte solution (CES), or skim milk (SM) in a randomized, cross-over fashion in a volume equal to 100% of their body mass loss during exercise. Whole body nitrogen turnover (Q), protein synthesis (S), protein breakdown (B), and whole body protein balance (WBPB) were measured over 16 h. Protein intake from SM was 0.40 ± 0.10 g/kg. Over 16 h, Q and S were significantly greater (P < 0.01) with SM than W and CES. B demonstrated a trend for a main effect for beverage (P = 0.063). WBPB was more negative (P < 0.01) with W and CES than with SM. In the SM trial, WBPB was positive in PEP, although it remained negative in MLP. Boys exhibited significantly more negative WBPB than girls (P < 0.05). Postexercise milk consumption enhances WBPB compared with W and CES; however, additional protein intake may be required to sustain a net anabolic environment over 16 h.

publication date

  • November 15, 2014

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