The Harris Design-2 total hip replacement fixed with so-called second-generation cementing techniques. A ten to fifteen-year follow-up. Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • We analyzed the clinical results of 195 Harris Design-2 total hip replacements performed with so-called second-generation cementing techniques in 166 consecutive patients who had osteoarthrosis. The mean age of the patients at the time of the replacement was sixty-seven years and nine months (range, thirty-one to eighty-nine years). Forty-eight patients (fifty-four hips) died before the time of the latest follow-up, but the implants were apparently functioning well at the time of death. Three patients (four hips) were lost to follow-up. Five patients (five hips; 3 percent) had a revision because of aseptic loosening of the acetabular or femoral component, or both, that was related to wear-induced osteolysis. The mean Harris hip score for the 131 hips that were available at the latest follow-up examination at a mean of twelve years (range, ten to fifteen years) after the operation was 89 +/- 10 points. On the basis of the Harris hip score, seventy-six hips had an excellent result, thirty-four had a good result, fifteen had a fair result, and six had a poor result at the latest follow-up examination. Radiographically, twelve (9 percent) of the 131 acetabular components and three (2 percent) of the 131 femoral components were probably or definitely loose. At a mean of twelve years, 186 (97 percent) of 191 Harris Design-2 implants were in situ or had been in situ at the time of the patient's death.

publication date

  • December 1998