Oral esomeprazole vs. intravenous pantoprazole: a comparison of the effect on intragastric pH in healthy subjects Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • BACKGROUND: Intravenous (IV) proton-pump inhibitor therapy is used in patients who cannot take oral medications or require greater acid suppression. Oral esomeprazole produces greater acid suppression than oral pantoprazole; however, no comparative data exist for oral esomeprazole and i.v. pantoprazole. AIM: To compare acid suppression (time with pH>3.0, 4.0, 5.0 and 6.0) produced by standard doses of oral esomeprazole and i.v. pantoprazole in healthy subjects. METHODS: A randomized, two-way crossover study in 30 subjects receiving oral esomeprazole (40 mg o.d.) or i.v. pantoprazole (40 mg o.d.) for 5 days followed by a 2-week washout period before the second 5-day drug administration period using the crossover drug regimen. RESULTS: Oral esomeprazole produced greater acid suppression than i.v. pantoprazole on day 1 [pH>3.0 (56.9%, 35.8%; P<0.001), pH>4.0 (43.4%, 25.0%; P<0.001) and pH>5.0 (28.7%, 15.6%; P<0.001)] and on day 5 [pH>3.0 (70.4%, 45.9%; P<0.001), pH>4.0 (59.2%, 33.9%; P<0.001), pH>5.0 (45.5%, 23.9%; P<0.001) and pH>6.0 (19.6%, 12.6%; P=0.045)]. The adverse event profiles indicated both treatments to be safe and well tolerated. CONCLUSIONS: In healthy subjects, esomeprazole, 40 mg o.d. dispersed in water, produces greater acid suppression than pantoprazole 40 mg i.v. o.d. after 1 and 5 days of medication.

publication date

  • October 2003

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