Long-term outcomes of laparoscopic surgery for colorectal cancer Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Multiple reports have outlined the potential benefits of the laparoscopic approach to colon surgery. Recently, randomized control trials have demonstrated the safety of applying these techniques to colorectal cancer. This study examined the long-term follow-up assessment of patients after laparoscopic colorectal cancer resections and compared them with a large prospective database of open resections. A total of 231 resections were performed for adenocarcinoma of the colon or rectum between 1992 and 2004. Of these 231 resections, 93 were rectal (40.3%) and 138 were colonic (59.7%). A total of 8 (3.2%) of the resections were performed as emergencies, and 27 (11.7%) were converted to open surgery. The mean follow-up period was 35.84 months (range, 0-132 months). The disease recurred in 51 of the patients (22.1%) before death, involving 14 (6.1%) local and 37 (16%) distant recurrences. Only two patients had wound recurrences (0.8%), and both patients had widespread peritoneal recurrence at the time of diagnosis. The overall survival rate was 65.3% at 60 months and 60.3% at 120 months. The disease-free survival rate was 58% at 60 months and 56% at 120 months. Laparoscopic techniques can be applied to a wide range of colorectal malignancies without sacrificing oncologic results during a long-term follow-up period.

authors

publication date

  • January 2006