A phase I study of OSI-211 and cisplatin as intravenous infusions given on days 1, 2 and 3 every 3 weeks in patients with solid cancers Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • BACKGROUND: OSI-211 (also known as NX211) is a liposomal preparation of the topoisomerase I inhibitor, lurtotecan, which has shown antitumor activity in phase I and II clinical trials. Cisplatin is a widely used antineoplastic agent with activity in a broad range of tumor types. This phase I trial was conducted to determine the recommended doses of these agents, and their pharmacokinetic properties and toxicities in patients with advanced solid malignancies. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Fourteen patients with advanced and/or metastatic solid malignancies were enrolled in this trial. The first planned dose level was OSI-211 0.9 mg/m(2) with cisplatin 25 mg/m(2) administered intravenously daily for the first three consecutive days of a 21-day cycle. Patients were evaluated for hematological and non-hematological toxicities, and pharmacokinetic studies were performed on both agents. RESULTS: The recommended phase II dose was determined to be 0.7 mg/m(2) OSI-211 given with 25 mg/m(2) cisplatin. Dose-limiting neutropenia was seen in two of three patients at the starting dose level. Three of 11 patients at the second (lower) dose level experienced dose-limiting thrombocytopenia; febrile neutropenia was also seen in one patient. Non-hematological toxicities were generally manageable and included fatigue, nausea and vomiting. Considerable variability was seen in both hematological toxicities and pharmacokinetics. One complete response and three partial responses were seen. CONCLUSIONS: The recommended phase II dose for this combination is 0.7 mg/m(2) OSI-211 with 25 mg/m(2) cisplatin given as an intravenous infusion on days 1, 2 and 3 of a 21-day cycle. The main toxicity was myelosuppression. Preliminary evidence of antitumor activity was seen.

publication date

  • April 1, 2004