Jejunostomy tube feeding in patients undergoing esophagectomy Academic Article uri icon

  •  
  • Overview
  •  
  • Research
  •  
  • Identity
  •  
  • Additional Document Info
  •  
  • View All
  •  

abstract

  • BACKGROUND: Surgical jejunostomy tubes are a routine part of elective esophagectomies in patients with carcinomas and provide a route for nutritional support in those who experience complications. We wished to determine how frequently oral intake is delayed and the amount of nutrition delivered via the jejunostomy tube. METHODS: We reviewed the charts of all adults undergoing esophagectomy for carcinoma between January 2000 and June 2008. We determined the proportion of patients unable to resume oral nutrition after 8 days and the amount of nutrition delivered in each of the 8 days. RESULTS: In all, 111 patients underwent elective esophagectomy for carcinoma, and 103 had a jejunostomy tube placed. The mean age was 67 ± 10.8 years. The median time to oral intake was 7 (interquartile range 7-11) days. Seventy-four (67%) patients resumed oral intake within 8 days. The mean nutrition delivered by jejunostomy within the first 8 days as a percentage of the target was 45.6% (95% confidence interval 41.2%-49.9%). Six (5.4%) patients experienced complications attributable solely to the jejunostomy tube; 3 (2.9%) required surgery. Forty (38.8%) patients had abdominal issues serious enough to warrant delaying the progression of feeding. CONCLUSION: Two-thirds of patients undergoing elective esophagectomy were tolerating oral intake by the end of the eighth postoperative day, and less than half of the target nutrition was delivered over the first 8 days. We now selectively place surgical jejunostomy tubes in patients undergoing elective esophagectomies.

publication date

  • December 1, 2013