Patients’ Diets and Preferences in a Pediatric Population with Inflammatory Bowel Disease Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • PURPOSE: To determine the dietary practices of the pediatric inflammatory bowel disease population at the Children's Hospital of the Hamilton Health Sciences Corporation and the reported effectiveness of those diets.PATIENTS AND METHODS: A questionnaire mailed to 153 pediatric patients was returned by 125 patients (76 Crohn's disease [CD] and 49 ulcerative colitis [UC] patients) - an 82% response rate.RESULTS: The median age of respondents was 13 years, and 62% were male. Ninety per cent and 71% of CD and UC patients, respectively, had changed their diets since diagnosis. Caloric supplements (eg, BOOST [Mead Johnson Nutritionals]), sole source nutrition, low fibre and lactose-free diets were used by more than 15% of CD patients, whereas lactose-free, nonspicy, low acid, additive-free, caloric supplement and low fibre diets were used by more than 15% of UC patients. A diet supplement was more commonly used in CD patients (P<0.05) and an additive-free diet in UC patients. Corn and corn products, nuts, milk and bran were avoided by more than 20% of CD and UC patients; however, more CD than UC patients avoided corn and corn products. In addition, UC patients (more than 20%) also avoided tomato, other dairy (nonfluid milk-based products and foods containing milk products), chocolate, cheese, wheat, tomato sauces and fruit juice. A benefit was reported for 103 of 141 reported diets, with the most commonly alleviated symptoms being abdominal pain, diarrhea and flatulence.CONCLUSION: Many children with inflammatory bowel disease have altered their diets to manage their disease and have attributed symptomatic relief to these diets.

publication date

  • 1998