Sodium-calcium exchange mediated contraction in left anterior descending and left ventricular branch arteries Academic Article uri icon

  •  
  • Overview
  •  
  • Research
  •  
  • Identity
  •  
  • Additional Document Info
  •  
  • View All
  •  

abstract

  • We tested the hypothesis that the de-endothelialized artery rings from the left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery and its left ventricular branch (LVB) differ in their contractile responses to Na(+)-Ca(2+)-exchanger (NCX) mediated Ca(2+)-entry, muscarinic receptor activation with carbachol, and sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) pump (SERCA) inhibition with thapsigargin. In LVB, the force of contraction (in N/g tissue) produced by the NCX mediated Ca(2+)-entry (17.5 +/- 1.4) and carbachol (18 +/- 1.5) was only slightly smaller than that due to membrane depolarization with KCl (24.0 +/- 1.0). In contrast, in LAD the force of contraction produced with NCX (8.7 +/- 0.7) and carbachol (6.1 +/- 1.1) was much smaller than with KCl (15.7 +/- 0.7). Thapsigargin also contracted LVB with greater force than LAD. When isolated microsomes were used, the binding to the muscarinic receptor antagonist quinuclidinyl benzilate was greater in LVB than in LAD. Microsomes were also used for Western blots. The intensities of signals for both SERCA and NCX were greater in LVB than in LAD. These biochemical observations were consistent with the contractile experiments. Thus, it appears that the differences between LAD and the resistance arteries may begin as early as LVB.

authors

publication date

  • September 2009

has subject area