Neurotransmitter Regulation of Growth Hormone and ACTH in the Rhesus Monkey: Effects of Biogenic Amines Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • In an attempt to clarify the role of central neurotransmitters in GH and ACTH regulation, chair-adapted unanesthetized adult male rhesus monkeys and chronic indwelling intratrial cannulae were given 30 min infusions of various agonists known to affect central amines, and plasma samples were withdrawn for GH and cortisol determinations. Infusion of acid-saline vehicle alone had no significant effect on plasma GH or cortisol (P less than 0.05). L-Dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-Dopa) (4.5 and 45 mg/kg), but not apomorphine (7 mug/kg), a specific dopaminergic agonist, produced significant elevations of GH. Both noradrenergic (clonidine HCl, 1.5, 15, and 150 mug/kg, and D,L-threodihydroxyphenylserine (D,L-threodops) 90 mg/kg) and serotoninergic (5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan (5-HTP), 45 mg/kg) agonists induced significant GH responses. These findings suggest that GH is regulated in the rhesus monkey by noradrenergic and serotoninergic neurons, whereas participation of dopaminergic neurons has not been established. Significant cortisol responses were only observed following infusion of 5HTP (45 mg/kg). Dopaminergic and noradrenergic agonists not only failed to alter resting cortisol levels but also did not affect the cortisol response to 5-HTP. In the rhesus monkey serotoninergic mechanisms appear to be responsible for the regulation of resting cortisol levels. A catecholamine inhibitory mechanism was not demonstrated in this species.

publication date

  • February 1976

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