Subcellular fractionation of pig coronary artery smooth muscle Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • A detailed procedure for subcellular fractionation of the smooth muscle from pig coronary arteries based on dissection of the proper tissue, homogenization, differential centrifugation and sucrose density gradient centrifugation is described. A number of marker enzymes and Ca2+ uptake in presence or absence of oxalate, ruthenium red and azide were studied. The ATP-dependent oxalate-independent azide- or ruthenium red-insensitive Ca2+ uptake, and the plasma membrane markers K+-activated ouabain-sensitive p-nitrophenylphosphatase, 5'-nucleotidase and Mg2+-ATPase showed maximum enrichment in the F2 fraction (15-28% sucrose) which was also contaminated with the endoplasmic reticulum marker NADPH: cytochrome c reductase, and to a small extent with the inner mitochondrial marker cytochrome c reductase, and also showed a small degree of oxalate stimulation of the Ca2+ uptake. F3 fraction (28-40% sucrose) was maximally enriched in the ATP- and oxalate-dependent azide-insensitive Ca2+ uptake and the endoplasmic reticulum marker NADPH: cytochrome c reductase but was heavily contaminated with the plasma membrane and the inner mitochondrial markers. The mitochondrial fraction was enriched in cytochrome c oxidase and azide- or ruthenium red-sensitive ATP-dependent Ca2+ uptake but was heavily contaminated with other membranes. Electron microscopy showed that F2 contained predominantly smooth surface vesicles and F3 contained smooth surface vesicles, rough endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. The ATP-dependent azide-insensitive oxalate-independent and oxalate-stimulated Ca2+ uptake comigrated with the plasma membrane and the endoplasmic reticulum markers, respectively, and were preferentially inhibited by digitonin and phosphatidylserine, respectively. This study establishes a basis for studies on receptor distribution and further Ca2+ uptake studies to understand the physiology of coronary artery vasodilation.

publication date

  • August 1985

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