Plasma metabolites, volume and electrolytes following 30-s high-intensity exercise in boys and men Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • It has been shown that boys recover faster than men following brief, high-intensity exercise. Better to understand this difference, plasma metabolite concentration, volume, electrolyte concentration [electrolyte], and hydrogen ion concentration [H+] changes were compared in five prepubescent boys [mean age 9.6 (SD 0.9) years] and 5 men [mean age 24.9 (SD 4.3) years] following 30-s, all-out cycling. Blood was collected prior to, at the end, and at the 1st, 3rd and 10th min following exercise. At the 10th min of recovery, the men's lactate concentration was 14.2 (SD 1.8) mmol.l-1 and [H+] was 66.1 (SD 5.9) nmol.l-1, compared with 5.7 (SD 0.7) mmol.l-1 and 47.5 (SD 1.2) nmol.l-1 respectively, in the boys (P < 0.01 for both). The glycerol concentration was higher in the boys at the end of exercise and until the 3rd min of recovery. Plasma volume (PV) decreased more in the men [16.9 (SD 3.0)%] than in the boys [9.4 (SD 2.8)%]. In both groups, [electrolyte] increased after exercise, tending to be higher in the men. Recovery of plasma [electrolyte] and PV started earlier in the boys (1st min) than in the men (3rd min). These findings would support the notion of a lesser reliance on glycolytic energy pathways in children and may explain the faster recovery of muscle power in boys compared to men.

publication date

  • March 1996