Blood lipid profiles in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • BACKGROUND: Abnormal blood lipid profiles have been associated with cancer. The objective of this study was to investigate the frequency and clinical significance of altered lipid profiles in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the most common form of malignant disease in this age group. METHODS: Fasting blood lipid profiles (cholesterol [C], triglycerides [TG], high density lipoprotein [HDL], low density lipoprotein, very low density lipoprotein, apolipoproteins A1 [apo A1] and B, and lipoprotein a [Lp(a)]) were obtained in 24 children with ALL at diagnosis, 16 children during consolidation therapy with L-asparaginase, and 18 children during maintenance therapy without L-asparaginase. For comparison the authors studied lipid profiles in 15 children previously treated for leukemia, 15 healthy control children, and 17 children with other forms of cancer, both localized and widespread. RESULTS: An altered blood lipid profile was observed at the time of diagnosis of ALL. Statistically significant values included elevated TG (1.82+/-1.23 mmol/L), reduced HDL-C (0.54+/-0.24 mmol/L), and reduced ApoA1 (0.77+/-0.18 g/L) levels. A wide range of Lp(a) levels (0-1990 mg/L) were observed. Significantly reduced HDL-C (0.55+/-0.20 mmol/L) and ApoA1 (0.69+/-0.22 g/L) were observed in children with widespread but not localized solid tumors at diagnosis. C and TG correlated with serum albumin levels. Significant therapy-related changes in lipid profiles were observed in children with ALL during combination therapy with L-asparaginase (extremely elevated TG levels [3.34+/-2.82 mmol/L] and a striking reduction in Lp(a) levels) that were not observed during combination therapy without L-asparaginase or in children during treatment for solid tumors. In this small study there was no relation between these abnormalities and either thromboembolic events or pancreatitis. Blood lipid profiles in children with ALL returned to normal on completion of therapy. CONCLUSIONS: The lipid abnormalities observed at diagnosis in children with widespread cancer (ALL or solid tumors) may reflect altered nutritional states or altered lipid metabolism. Reduced concentrations of Lp(a) and elevated TG levels suggest L-asparaginase specific alterations and may provide insight into the toxicity associated with this drug.

publication date

  • July 15, 1998

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