A Systematic Review of Curricular Interventions Teaching Transitional Care to Physicians-in-Training and Physicians Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • PURPOSE: To systematically review and describe published interventions about teaching continuity-of-care best practices, embodied by transitional care, to physician-trainees and physicians. METHOD: The authors performed a systematic review of interventions indexed in PubMed, ISI Web of Science, Educational Resources Information Center, professional society Web sites, education databases, and hand-selected references. English-language articles published between 1973 and 2010 that demonstrated purposeful, directed education of physician-trainees and physicians on topics consistent with the contemporary definition of transitional care were included. Abstracted data included intended audience, duration/intensity, objectives, resources used, learner assessment, and curricular evaluation method. RESULTS: A dramatic increase in the number of published interventions teaching transitional care was noted in the last 10 years. Learners included preclinical medical students through attending physicians and also included allied health professionals. Brief, self-limited interactions in large groups were the most frequent mode of interaction. A wide array of objectives and resources used were represented. Most interventions provided a method for assessing knowledge acquisition by the learner; however, few interventions provided a mechanism for eliciting feedback from learners. CONCLUSIONS: Proficiency in providing transitional care is an essential skill for medical practitioners. Historically, there have been few curricular interventions teaching this topic; however, recently a dramatic increase in the number of interventions has occurred. A diverse range of learners, modes of delivery, and intended objectives are represented. In establishing a pooled description of published interventions, this review provides a comprehensive and novel resource for educators charged with designing curricula for all medical professionals.

publication date

  • May 2011