Thrombin-induced inositol phosphate production by platelets from rats with diet-induced or genetically determined hypercholesterolemia. Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Platelets from rats with diet-induced or genetically determined hypercholesterolemia are hypersensitive to thrombin through a pathway that is independent of the effects of released ADP or formation of thromboxane A2. We examined production of inositol phosphates by platelets from these hypercholesterolemic rats to determine whether the enhanced responsiveness to thrombin is associated with increased production of inositol trisphosphate (IP3). The opportunity to study rats with hypercholesterolemia determined genetically or induced by diet makes it possible to determine whether any differences in inositol phosphate production are caused by hypercholesterolemia alone rather than to any other effect of the diet used to induce hypercholesterolemia. Platelets were prelabeled with [3H]inositol so that increases in inositol phosphates (IP, IP2, and IP3) upon stimulation with thrombin could be assessed by measuring the amount of label in these compounds. Platelets were preincubated with CP/CPK, to inhibit effects of released ADP, and aspirin, to inhibit formation of thromboxane A2/endoperoxides. In platelets from rats with either form of hypercholesterolemia, the percentage increase in labeling of IP3 was significantly greater 30 seconds after stimulation with low concentrations of thrombin than in platelets from control rats. Increased IP3 formation in platelets from hypercholesterolemic rats indicates that there is increased activity of a pathway(s) leading to IP3 formation and that this may be a mechanism responsible for the thrombin-induced hypersensitivity of these platelets.

publication date

  • February 1990