Oncostatin M, but Not Interleukin-6 or Leukemia Inhibitory Factor, Stimulates Expression of Alpha1-Proteinase Inhibitor in A549 Human Alveolar Epithelial Cells Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor (A1-Pi) is the main serine proteinase inhibitor found in human plasma and is a potent elastase inhibitor in various tissues, including lung. A1-Pi is expressed and induced in liver during inflammatory responses but can also be produced by epithelial cells. Since hepatocyte A1-Pi production is stimulated by interleukin-6 (IL-6) and other gp130-cytokines, such as leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) and oncostatin M (OM), we investigated the role of these cytokines in regulating A1-Pi in lung epithelial cells. We show that OM, a monocyte and T cell product, can specifically and potently induce A1-Pi production in lung-derived A549 alveolar (epithelial) cells, as well as in liver-derived HepG2 cells. Both A1-Pi protein (as detected by ELISA and Western blots) and mRNA levels were enhanced 20-fold to 30-fold in A549 cells. OM was also able to stimulate the expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 in these cells. Interestingly, other members of the IL-6 family (IL-6 and LIF) had little or no effect on A549 cells, and proinflammatory cytokines, such as IL-1 beta and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) also had no stimulatory effect on A1-Pi synthesis in A549 cells. Costimulation with IL-1 beta resulted in a decrease in A1-Pi production from OM-stimulated A549 cells. However, IL-6 production was synergistically enhanced. OM was also able to stimulate A1-Pi production from a bronchial epithelial primary cell line, whereas an intestinal epithelial cell line HT29 responded to IL-6 but not OM. These results suggest that lung levels A1-Pi could be derived not only from liver and inflammatory cells but also from epithelial cells, which can be upregulated on stimulation by OM. This may have implications for regulation of local activity of human neutrophil elastase (HNE) in such diseases as emphysema and cystic fibrosis.

publication date

  • June 1997

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