Noncompliance in an exercise rehabilitation program for men who have suffered a myocardial infarction. Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • A group of 163 men in the Hamilton, Ont. region who had suffered a myocardial infarction were enrolled in a rehabilitation program of physical activity. These men constituted one cohort of a multicentre collaborative study designed to determine the effects of regular exercise of differing intensity on morbidity and mortality over a 4-year period.The noncompliance rate was 43% for the men who could have participated for 1 year, 46% of whom were classified as noncompliers within 1 month of entry into the program. There was no difference in overall compliance between the men exercising at high intensity and those exercising at low intensity; lack of motivation or interest was the most common reason for their leaving the program. Those leaving the program early tended to have a type A behaviour pattern (they were aggressive, ambitious and competitive, with a chronic sense of time urgency), were inactive during their leisure time, had had at least two previous infarctions and smoked. These characteristics suggest that the men leaving the program early may have been those at greatest risk for a further myocardial infarction.

publication date

  • February 18, 1978

published in