Cultural sensitivity training among foreign medical graduates Academic Article uri icon

  •  
  • Overview
  •  
  • Research
  •  
  • Identity
  •  
  • Additional Document Info
  •  
  • View All
  •  

abstract

  • OBJECTIVES: To examine the effectiveness of culture sensitivity training for foreign-trained medical graduates licensed to practice in Ontario, Canada. DESIGN: A study of pretest-post-test design was conducted to determine the effect of cultural sensitivity training on newly immigrated physicians licensed in Canada. Twenty-four physicians, those who had passed the medical licensing exam in 1996 and had not yet started their residency program, were given 15 hours of cultural sensitivity training and were considered the experimental group. This group was compared with a control group of 24 physicians who had passed the licensing exam and were in the process of completing residency. SETTING: University of Toronto. SUBJECTS: Foreign-trained medical graduates. RESULTS: Both groups completed the Cross-Cultural Adaptability Inventory both before and after the training of the experimental group. Statistical significance in three subscales of the Open-Mindedness/Flexibility, Emotional Resilience and Perceptual Acuity dimensions were demonstrated in the experimental group as compared with the control group. CONCLUSIONS: In order for Canada to mould professional and effective physicians great care must be taken in the design and process of cultural sensitivity programmes to enhance both knowledge and skills. Follow-up should be undertaken to compare their effectiveness with the control group.

publication date

  • March 1999