Lymphoid tissues induce NGF-dependent and NGF-independent neurite outgrowth from rat superior cervical ganglia explants in culture Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Induction of neurite outgrowth from superior cervical ganglia (SCG) by rat lymphoid tissues was studied using a tissue culture model. Neonatal rat SCG were cultured with 6-12-week-old rat thymus, spleen, or mesenteric lymph node (MLN) explants in a Matrigel layer, in defined culture medium without exogenous nerve growth factor (NGF). SCG were also co-cultured with neonatal rat heart (as positive control) or spinal cord (SC; as negative control). To determine whether inflammation affects the ability of lymphoid tissues to induce neurite outgrowth, we also examined MLN at various times after infecting rats with Nip-postrongylus brasiliensis (Nb-MLN). In one series of experiments, a single lymphoid tissue explant was surrounded by four SCG at a distance of 1 mm. The extent of neurite outgrowth was determined by counting the number of neurites 0.5 mm away from each ganglion at several time points. Adult thymus and, to a lesser extent, spleen had strong stimulatory effects on neurite outgrowth from SCG after 12 hr or more in culture. For thymus tissue, this was similar to the positive control heart explants. MLN from normal rats had minimal effect on neurite outgrowth; however, Nb-MLN showed a time-dependent enhancement of the neurite outgrowth, maximal at 3 weeks after infection. The relative efficacy of neurite outgrowth induction (heart > or = thymus > or = Nb-MLN > or spleen > or = MLN > or = SC) was confirmed in a second series of experiments where one SCG was surrounded by three different tissue explants. We then examined the role of 2.5S NGF, a well-known trophic factor for sympathetic nerves, in the lymphoid tissue-induced neurite outgrowth. Anti-NGF treatment of co-cultures of SCG and heart almost completely blocked the neurite outgrowth. Anti-NGF also significantly inhibited thymus- and spleen-induced neurite outgrowth, but not as effectively as heart-induced neuritogenesis (93, 80, and 77% inhibition at 24 hr; 86, 70, and 68% inhibition at 48 hr for heart, thymus, and spleen, respectively). On the other hand, anti-NGF inhibited only 8% of neurite outgrowth induced by 3-week post-infection Nb-MLN at 24 hr, and 41% at 48 hr. These data show that several adult rat lymphoid tissues exert neurotrophic/tropic effects. The predominant growth factor in thymus and spleen is NGF, while Nb-MLN produces factor(s) which is (are) immunologically distinguishable from NGF.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

publication date

  • February 15, 1994