Hormone-sensitive lipase activity and triacylglycerol hydrolysis are decreased in rat soleus muscle by cyclopiazonic acid Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) is a sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase inhibitor that increases intracellular calcium. The role of CPA in regulating the oxidation and esterification of palmitate, the hydrolysis of intramuscular lipids, and the activation of hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) was examined in isolated rat soleus muscles at rest. CPA (40 micro M) was added to the incubation medium to levels that resulted in subcontraction increases in muscle tension, and lipid metabolism was monitored using the previously described pulse-chase procedure. CPA did not alter the cellular energy state, as reflected by similar muscle contents of ATP, phosphocreatine, free AMP, and free ADP. CPA increased total palmitate uptake into soleus muscle (11%, P < 0.05) and was without effect on palmitate oxidation. This resulted in greater esterification of exogenous palmitate into the triacylglycerol (18%, P < 0.05) and phospholipid (89%, P < 0.05) pools. CPA decreased (P < 0.05) intramuscular lipid hydrolysis, and this occurred as a result of reduced HSL activity (20%, P < 0.05). Incubation of muscles with 3 mM caffeine, which is also known to increase Ca2+ without affecting the cellular energy state, reduced HSL activity (24%, P < 0.05). KN-93, a calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase inhibitor (CaMKII), blocked the effects of CPA and caffeine, and HSL activity returned to preincubation values. The results of the present study demonstrate that CPA simultaneously decreases intramuscular triacylglycerol (IMTG) hydrolysis and promotes lipid storage in isolated, intact soleus muscle. The decreased IMTG hydrolysis is likely mediated by reduced HSL activity, possibly via the CaMKII pathway. These responses are not consistent with the increased hydrolysis and decreased esterification observed in contracting muscle when substrate availability and the hormonal milieu are tightly controlled. It is possible that more powerful signals or a higher [Ca2+] may override the lipid-storage effect of the CPA-mediated effects during muscular contractions.

publication date

  • August 2003

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