Effects of repeated maternal betamethasone administration on growth and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal function of the ovine fetus at term Academic Article uri icon

  •  
  • Overview
  •  
  • Research
  •  
  • Identity
  •  
  • Additional Document Info
  •  
  • View All
  •  

abstract

  • Synthetic glucocorticoids have become an important clinical tool with which to advance fetal lung maturation in women at risk of early preterm birth, and this has succeeded in reducing neonatal mortality and morbidity from respiratory distress syndrome. Although previous studies have shown that glucocorticoids have deleterious consequences on fetal development, there is little information regarding the effects of clinically relevant repeated maternal doses of glucocorticoids on fetal growth and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) function. We hypothesised that repeated prenatal exposure to increased concentrations of glucocorticoids would alter fetal growth and HPA axis development. Pregnant ewes were injected with betamethasone (0.5 mg/kg) or vehicle at 104, 111 and 118 days of gestation (term 150 days). Animals were sacrificed at 125 and 146 days of gestation, at which time fetal weights were recorded. Maternal and fetal blood samples were gathered and fetal tissue collected. Maternal oestradiol concentrations were significantly greater than those in controls at 125 days of gestation, but were not different at 146 days. Maternal plasma progesterone concentrations were similar between groups at both 125 and 146 days of gestation. Weight at birth was significantly reduced by 23% at 125 days and 19% at 146 days of gestation (P<0.05) after exposure to glucocorticoid. Cord plasma ACTH concentrations were not significantly different between groups at day 125, but were significantly increased in day 146 fetuses of ewes that had received betamethasone (P<0.05). Cord plasma cortisol concentrations followed the same trend, although differences were not statistically significant. Cord plasma corticosteroid binding capacity (CBC) was significantly increased at 125 days of gestation in fetuses of betamethasone-treated animals (P<0.05), but not at 146 days of gestation. To examine the mechanisms regulating the increase in cord plasma ACTH of 146-day fetuses, we used in situ hybridisation to determine the distribution and levels of mRNA encoding key pituitary and hypothalamic neuropeptides of the HPA axis. In pituitaries of 146-day fetuses, there were no significant differences in the regional pattern of distribution or amounts of pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) mRNA between betamethasone-treated animals and controls, in either the pars intermedia or the inferior and superior regions of the pars distalis. Neither prohormone convertase (PC)-1 nor PC-2 mRNA levels in pituitaries of 146-day fetuses were significantly different between treatment groups. After maternal betamethasone, immunoreactive ACTH peptide content in the fetal pars distalis was not different but glucocorticoid receptor (GR) mRNA levels in the pars distalis were increased significantly (P<0.05). No significant difference in distribution pattern or concentrations of corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) mRNA, GR mRNA, oxytocin mRNA and pre-proenkephalin mRNA were found in hypothalami from fetuses at 146 days of gestation after betamethasone treatment. We conclude that antenatal betamethasone given to pregnant sheep in a manner similar to that used in human obstetric practice results in reduced weight at birth at 125 and 146 days, and altered basal cord levels of plasma ACTH and corticosteroid binding capacity, but these changes are not reflective of changes in steady state concentrations of POMC and CRH mRNA in the fetal pituitary or hypothalamus.

publication date

  • April 1, 2000

has subject area