Fiberoptic Orotracheal Intubation on Anesthetized Patients Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • BACKGROUND: With increasing pressure to use operating room time efficiently, opportunities for residents to learn fiberoptic orotracheal intubation in the operating room have declined. The purpose of this study was to determine whether fiberoptic orotracheal intubation skills learned outside the operating room on a simple model could be transferred into the clinical setting. METHODS: First-year anesthesiology residents and first- and second-year internal medicine residents were recruited. Subjects were randomized to a didactic-teaching-only group (n = 12) or a model-training group (n = 12). The didactic-teaching group received a detailed lecture from an expert bronchoscopist. The model-training group was guided, by experts, through tasks performed on a simple model designed to refine fiberoptic manipulation skills. After the training session, subjects performed a fiberoptic orotracheal intubation on healthy, consenting, anesthetized, paralyzed female patients undergoing elective surgery with predicted "easy" laryngoscopic intubations. Two blinded anesthesiologists evaluated each subject. RESULTS: After the training session, the model group significantly outperformed the didactic group in the operating room when evaluated with a global rating scale (P < 0.01)and checklist (P0.05). Model-trained subjects completed the fiberoptic orotracheal intubation significantly faster than didactic-trained subjects (P < 0.01). Model-trained subjects were also more successful at achieving tracheal intubation than the didactic group (P < 0.005). CONCLUSION: Fiberoptic orotracheal intubation skills training on a simple model is more effective than conventional didactic instruction for transfer to the clinical setting. Incorporating an extraoperative model into the training of fiberoptic orotracheal intubation may greatly reduce the time and pressures that accompany teaching this skill in the operating room.

authors

  • Naik, Viren N
  • Matsumoto, Edward Daisuke
  • Houston, Patricia L
  • Hamstra, Stanley J
  • Yeung, Raymond Y-M
  • Mallon, Joseph S
  • Martire, Terry M

publication date

  • August 2001