Effects of Chronic Cerebellar Stimulation (CCS) Setting on the Gait and Speech of a Spastic Cerebral Palsy Adult Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • A single (N = 1) spastic cerebral palsy adult who had experienced Chronic Cerebellar Stimulation (CCS) for 9 years without any change in the stimulator settings was assessed at six different stimulator settings. These voltage settings varied from 0 volts to 40 volts and frequencies of stimulation from 0 to 200 Hz. Stimulation was with bipolar rectangular pulses with less than 0.2 C/mm2 charge per phase. Responses measured at each setting were quantitative gait, speech, and somatosensory evoked potential measurements. Additional clinical assessments were done by a neurologist and speech therapist. Alteration in stimulator settings occurred 1 week apart to allow for stabilization and all assessments were completed in the same sequence each day. None of the individual stimulator settings were known to any of the assessors or to the patient. The results showed consistently that the patient's gait and speech were poorest when the stimulator was switched off completely. Switching on the stimulator caused improved function according to all assessments. There was consistent improvement in gait and speech when the rate of the cerebellar stimuli was high (for voltages between 0 and 40 V). Changing the voltage (within the range 0 to 40 V), while keeping the frequency of stimulation constant, did not appear to have as much effect. This preliminary evaluation suggests that the technique of CCS is safe and can improve function in a measurable manner.

publication date

  • May 1989