Feasibility of the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure for Routine Use Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Purpose: Despite encouragement, routine outcome measurement is not standard practice in occupational therapy. This applies across most practice areas and outcome measures, including occupational therapy measures such as the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure. Barriers to using outcome measures have been proposed, but are gathered from therapists not measuring outcomes routinely. This study gathered therapists' perceptions on outcome measurement following a period of routine outcome measure use. A secondary aim was to propose a therapist-driven template for summarising outcome data routinely. Procedures: Using a process evaluation, a short answer survey was used with three occupational therapists following 5 months of Canadian Occupational Performance Measure use in older people's rehabilitation. The data were summarised descriptively, using a proposed template based on therapist feedback. Findings: The therapists perceived that the measure facilitated treatment for both therapists and clients but they experienced challenges related to client cognition and sustaining use. Template creation indicated that the therapists placed more importance on individual than group level data. Conclusion: The therapists perceived benefit in routine Canadian Occupational Performance Measure use. The instrument appears feasible for meaningful and routine use but not necessarily for sustained use. Increasing outcome measure use is complex, requiring more knowledge on barriers, expectations of value and methods of data utilisation.

publication date

  • February 2010