Effect of the posterior cruciate ligament in knee-joint proprioception in total knee arthroplasty Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • The primary purpose of the study was to examine the role of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) in knee-joint proprioception after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Knee-joint proprioception was measured in 10 patients with nonsacrificed PCL TKAs and 10 with sacrificed PCL TKAs. Knee-joint proprioception was evaluated through reproduction of static knee angles using a Penny and Giles electrogoniometer. The primary variable was absolute angular error (AAE). AAE was defined as the absolute value of the difference between the test angle and the patient's perceived version of the test angle. Proprioception deficit was compared to the WOMAC questionnaire which evaluates pain, stiffness, and physical function of the lower extremity. No significant difference was found between the nonsacrificed PCL TKA (4.33 degrees +/- 1.52 degrees) and sacrificed PCL TKA (4.38 degrees +/- 1.39 degrees) AAE values (P > .4). Furthermore, no significant differences were observed in the WOMAC questionnaire scores for all three parameters between the two types of knee prosthesis (P > .35). The current findings suggest that the preservation of the PCL in TKA may not improve knee-joint proprioception and subsequently may not improve TKA functional performance.

publication date

  • August 1998