Predictors of in-hospital mortality following operative management of hip fractures. Academic Article uri icon

  •  
  • Overview
  •  
  • Research
  •  
  • Identity
  •  
  • Additional Document Info
  •  
  • View All
  •  

abstract

  • OBJECTIVE: To identify predictors of in-hospital mortality and hospital stay following hip fractures. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study of 185 consecutive patients. SETTING: Tertiary Care University Hospital. PARTICIPANTS: Individuals requiring operative treatment of a proximal femoral fracture excluding those individuals < 50 years old, with femoral head or subtrochanteric fractures, and significant co-morbidity. OUTCOMES: In-hospital mortality and length of hospital stay (days). RESULTS: 116 patients met the inclusion criteria. Predictors of in-hospital mortality from logistic regression analysis included male gender (odds ratio with 95% CI: 5.5, 1.5-20.5), admission from a long term care facility (5.5, 1.4-22.6), age greater than 90 years (4.5, 0.9-22.1), and living at home with support (0.2, 0.03-0.9). Predictors of hospital stay from multivariate regression analysis in order of magnitude included presence of a post-operative complication (odds ratio with 95% CI: 14.1, 4.7-44), living at home with support (3.4, 1.3-8.9) and older age (> 85 years) (2.7, 1.0-7.3). Moreover, confusion, urinary tract infections and decubitus ulcers accounted for greater than 50% of all complications encountered. A trend between the number of positive predictors and length of hospital stay was observed. CONCLUSIONS: Elderly individuals admitted from a long term care facility are at high risk of mortality following operative fixation of hip fractures. Early recognition and aggressive management of post-operative complications such as confusion, urinary tract infections and decubitus ulcers through careful patient monitoring may decrease hospital stays in those that survive.

publication date

  • 1999