Impact of migraine on patients and their families: the Migraine And Zolmitriptan Evaluation (MAZE) survey – Phase III Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • OBJECTIVE: To investigate the impact of migraine on migraineurs and their families and evaluate migraineurs' preference for different treatment formulations. This study also assessed the prevalence and impact of migraine with menstruation. METHODS: Participants (n = 1028) from around the world (USA [39%], Canada [20%], Europe [37%] and other countries [4%]) completed an online questionnaire. Of these, 866 were migraineurs and 162 were non-migraineurs living with/related to migraineurs. Migraineurs were identified based on responses to a modified Kiel questionnaire and/or diagnosis of migraine by a doctor. Disability was quantified using the Migraine Disability Assessment Scale (MIDAS). RESULTS: Migraineurs missed more days from family/leisure activities than from work/school (mean 4.2 vs 2.4 days) in the previous 3 months. On an additional 6.2 days within the 3-month period, productivity at work/school was reduced by at least half. Inability and reduced ability (by at least half) to perform household work were reported on 6.0 and 6.5 days, respectively. Of the women surveyed, 51% identified menstruation as a trigger for attacks and 6% reported attacks solely with menstruation (i. e. attacks occurred during menstruation on at least 9 out of 10 occasions), the latter associated with a higher pain score than other attacks. Living with or being related to a migraineur decreased nonmigraineurs' ability to participate in home/family life (moderate/great impact 49%) and social/leisure activities (moderate/great impact 47%). In a tradeoff analysis, 60% of treatment choice was driven by formulation type and 40% was driven by speed of onset. As migraine disability increased, speed of onset became more important. CONCLUSIONS: This study confirms the significant burden of migraine on patients and families/cohabitants, highlighting not only reduced productivity and absences from work/school, but also time missed from family/social occasions. Many women identify menstruation to be associated with more painful attacks. Overall, in terms of treatment choice, formulation type was a more important driver than speed of onset; however, as migrainerelated disability escalates, speed of onset becomes more important. To optimise migraine management, treatment choice should be based on individual patients' needs and preferences.

publication date

  • July 2004

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