Influence of exogenous factor VIIa on thrombin generation in cord plasma of full-term and pre-term newborns Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Factor (F) VIIa has been used to treat adults and children with a variety of bleeding disorders. The results from these studies cannot be extrapolated to newborns because their hemostatic system differs significantly from adults, which may influence the effects of FVIIa on thrombin (IIa) generation. We compared the effects of FVIIa concentrates on IIa generation in plasmas from adults, full-term newborns and pre-term newborns. Defibrinated plasma (using arvin) from adults, or umbilical cords from full-term or pre-term deliveries was supplemented with FVIIa (Novo Nordisk, Bagsvaerd, Denmark), mixed with dilute thromboplastin reagent, and the resultant reaction mixture subsampled periodically into ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid, followed by measurement of total IIa activity (S-2238). Thrombin-alpha2 macroglobulin complexes, determined as residual activity after neutralization with heparin and antithrombin, were subtracted from total IIa to give free IIa. Prothrombin (FII) and inhibitor complexes were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Addition of FVIIa caused a reduction in the lag phase for the appearance of free IIa and consumption of FII, which was more pronounced in newborn plasma. There was no increase in peak IIa levels regardless of the amount of FVIIa added. Final inhibitor complex concentrations were increased in plasmas from adults compared with newborns, likely reflecting higher plasma concentrations of FII in adults. Generation of IIa was more rapid in pre-term plasma compared with that in adult and full-term cord plasmas due to increased endogenous tissue factor (TF). In summary, FVIIa enhanced IIa generation in plasma from different age groups, with the effect being more pronounced in plasma from pre-term newborns, possibly due to increased levels of plasma TF.

publication date

  • June 2000