The Control of Hypertension In Pregnancy Study pilot trial Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • OBJECTIVE: To determine whether 'less tight' (versus 'tight') control of nonsevere hypertension results in a difference in diastolic blood pressure (dBP) between groups. DESIGN: Randomised controlled trial (ISRCTN#57277508). SETTING: Seventeen obstetric centres in Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and UK. POPULATION: Inclusion: pregnant women, dBP 90-109 mmHg, pre-existing/gestational hypertension; live fetus(es); and 20-33(+6) weeks. Exclusion: systolic blood pressure > or = 170 mmHg and proteinuria, contraindication, or major fetal anomaly. METHODS: Randomisation to less tight (target dBP, 100 mmHg) or tight (target dBP, 85 mmHg) blood pressure control. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Primary: mean dBP at 28, 32 and 36 weeks. Secondary: clinician compliance and women's satisfaction. Other: serious perinatal and maternal complications. RESULTS: A total of 132 women were randomised to less tight (n = 66; seven had no study visit) or tight control (n= 66; one was lost to follow up; seven had no study visit). Mean dBP was significantly lower with tight control: -3.5 mmHg, 95% credible interval (-6.4, -0.6). Clinician compliance was 79% in both groups. Women were satisfied with their care. With less tight (versus tight) control, the rates of other treatments and outcomes were the following: post-randomisation antenatal antihypertensive medication use: 46 (69.7%) versus 58 (89.2%), severe hypertension: 38 (57.6%) versus 26 (40.0%), proteinuria: 16 (24.2%) versus 20 (30.8%), serious maternal complications: 3 (4.6%) versus 2 (3.1%), preterm birth: 24 (36.4%) versus 26 (40.0%), birthweight: 2675 +/- 858 versus 2501 +/- 855 g, neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) admission: 15 (22.7%) versus 22 (34.4%), and serious perinatal complications: 9 (13.6%) versus 14 (21.5%). CONCLUSION: The CHIPS pilot trial confirms the feasibility and importance of a large definitive trial to determine the effects of less tight control on serious perinatal and maternal complications.

authors

  • Magee, LA
  • Von Dadelszen, P
  • Chan, S
  • Gafni, Amiram Jacob
  • Gruslin, A
  • Helewa, M
  • Hewson, S
  • Kavuma, E
  • Lee, SK
  • Logan, AG
  • McKay, D
  • Moutquin, J-M
  • Ohlsson, A
  • Rey, E
  • Ross, S
  • Singer, J
  • Willan, Andrew
  • Hannah, ME

publication date

  • June 2007