Do labetalol and methyldopa have different effects on pregnancy outcome? Analysis of data from the Control of Hypertension In Pregnancy Study (CHIPS) trial Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • OBJECTIVE: To compare pregnancy outcomes, accounting for allocated group, between methyldopa-treated and labetalol-treated women in the CHIPS Trial (ISRCTN 71416914) of 'less tight' versus 'tight' control of pregnancy hypertension. DESIGN: Secondary analysis of CHIPS Trial cohort. SETTING: International randomised controlled trial (94 sites, 15 countries). POPULATION OR SAMPLE: Of 987 CHIPS recruits, 481/566 (85.0%) women treated with antihypertensive therapy at randomisation. Of 981 (99.4%) women followed to delivery, 656/745 (88.1%) treated postrandomisation. METHODS: Logistic regression to compare outcomes among women who took methyldopa or labetalol, adjusted for the influence of baseline factors. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: CHIPS primary (perinatal loss or high level neonatal care for >48 hours) and secondary (serious maternal complications) outcomes, birthweight <10th centile, severe maternal hypertension, pre-eclampsia and delivery at <34 or <37 weeks. RESULTS: Methyldopa and labetalol were used commonly at randomisation (243/987, 24.6% and 238/987, 24.6%, respectively) and post-randomisation (224/981, 22.8% and 433/981, 44.1%, respectively). Following adjusted analyses, methyldopa (versus labetalol) at randomisation was associated with fewer babies with birthweight <10th centile [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 0.48; 95% CI 0.20-0.87]. Methyldopa (versus labetalol) postrandomisation was associated with fewer CHIPS primary outcomes (aOR 0.64; 95% CI 0.40-1.00), birthweight <10th centile (aOR 0.54; 95% CI 0.32-0.92), severe hypertension (aOR 0.51; 95% CI 0.31-0.83), pre-eclampsia (aOR 0.55; 95% CI 0.36-0.85), and delivery at <34 weeks (aOR 0.53; 95% CI 0.29-0.96) or <37 weeks (aOR 0.55; 95% CI 0.35-0.85). CONCLUSION: These nonrandomised comparisons are subject to residual confounding, but women treated with methyldopa (versus labetalol), particularly those with pre-existing hypertension, may have had better outcomes. TWEETABLE ABSTRACT: There was no evidence that women treated with methyldopa versus labetalol had worse outcomes.

authors

  • Magee, LA
  • Dadelszen, P
  • Singer, J
  • Lee, T
  • Rey, E
  • Ross, S
  • Asztalos, E
  • Murphy, KE
  • Menzies, J
  • Sanchez, J
  • Gafni, Amiram Jacob
  • Gruslin, A
  • Helewa, M
  • Hutton, E
  • Koren, G
  • Lee, SK
  • Logan, AG
  • Ganzevoort, JW
  • Welch, R
  • Thornton, JG
  • Moutquin, JM

publication date

  • June 2016